Category Archives: General

#Vote for @Knowbility to #UpgradeYourWorldUSA

What is #UpgradeYourWorldUSA?

Microsoft is supporting nonprofits who are improving their world. Ten organizations will receive cash investments ($50,000) and technology. And they are asking YOU to vote for your favorite local nonprofit by posting and tweeting.

We need YOUR help to win! Here’s why and how to help Knowbility.

Why should I vote for Knowbility?

Knowbility’s community programs make the web more accessible and help to ensure that technology empowers people with disabilities.

If you believe as we do that technology access for all upgrades our world, you can make an enormous contribution just by voting! Your vote each day until Sept 23, 2015 will support our community programs:

  • AccessWorks document remediation program provides technology training and direct employment opportunity for people with disabilities – including veterans with newly acquired disability.
  • The AccessWorks Usability portal provides short term revenue opportunities for people with disabilities to earn from home using their own technology.
  • ATSTAR helps children with disabilities succeed in school by providing assistive technology training to teachers.
  • MAPgoals supports teens with disabilities to become self-advocates as they transition to college and career
  • OpenAIR raises awareness of access to technology for all, by mentoring and training today’s web professionals in accessible design skills and techniques. This is also a means to create low-cost, high quality, professionally designed websites for other nonprofits.

I’m in! When do I vote?

Now! …and every day until September 23rd. The Upgrade Your World National Initiative by Microsoft starts at 12:01 a.m. Pacific Time (PT) on September 1, 2015, and ends at 11:59 p.m. PT on September 23, 2015 (“Voting Period”).

How do I vote?

There are three (3) ways to Vote during the Voting Period:

  1. Log in to your Twitter account and Tweet or re-Tweet, a public message with the hashtag #UpgradeYourWorldUSA and the hashtag #vote and our Twitter handle @knowbility.
    Here is an example of a simple Tweet: I #vote for @knowbility to #UpgradeYourWorldUSA.
  2.  You could also Tweet a short-story or the reason why you choose to vote for us.
    For example: I #vote for @knowbility to empower people with disabilities by making the web a more accessible place for everyone #UpgradeYourWorldUSA
  3. Log in to your Facebook account, visit  and find the post seeking public vote. Post a comment in response to this post which includes #UpgradeYourWorldUSA hashtag and the hashtag #vote and tag us: @knowbility.
  4. Visit and follow voting instructions to fill in our name to share on Facebook or Twitter.

You may also include text, photographs, video, voice, or like media that describes how Knowbility helps the community and upgrades the world.

How many times can I vote?

Each eligible submission – post or Tweet tagged with @knowbility and hashtags #UpgradeYourWorldUSA and #vote, will count as one vote. Limit one per person per account per day. Excess, incomplete or illegible submissions will be disqualified by Microsoft.

Everyone must have equal access to technology and internet, and if you understand the challenges of everyday (technology controlled) life that people with disabilities face, then you know that Knowbility is truly upgrading the world, so – please vote for us!

For more information, visit the Microsoft link:

To vote on the Microsoft website visit this link:

Microsoft #UpgradeYourWorld contest official rules:

Disability is Not a Problem; it is Part of Who You Are.

Article by Patricia Walsh, Principal at Blind Ambition Speaking and USA Para National Olympic-Distance Triathlon Champion 


When I was growing up, the future for persons with disabilities did not seem bright to me.  I was coached in the process for applying for SSDI.  I believed to collect social security was my ceiling with regard to my potential for inclusion.  As I have lived to see the tremendous change brought on by accessible technology I’m thrilled to have experienced firsthand the shattering of a ceiling of human potential.  Working and contributing is more than a pathway to income, it is a yellow brick road to quality of life, self-worth, and a sense of achievement.  Organizations such as Knowbility and similar organizations like the Blind Institute of Technology are driving the cultural changes to create new opportunities for individuals with disabilities.

Mike Hess is the founder of the Blind Institute for Technology based out of Denver, CO.  This nonprofit organization is dedicated to increasing representation of persons with blindness in the workforce particularly in the fields of science, math, engineering, and technology.  Hess believes that his success in the corporate world was not in spite of his blindness but actually attributed to his blindness.  He believes his listening skills, problem solving, and resourcefulness made him an invaluable contributor in corporate America.

Hess started BIT in order to be part of the solution.  They offer training for persons with blindness in tech-skills.  They also interface with corporations to convey that persons with blindness can be an invaluable peace for any solution.  BIT is a similar program to Knowbility’s Access works program.  Access Works has a reach beyond blindness but similar in its approach.  The premise being that the disability is not a problem it is an asset.  In a world that values diversity and creative solution there is now access to a previously untapped pool of talented skills individuals.

Congratulations to BIT and Mike Hess for building on a change in perspective that may result in improved quality of life for individuals with blindness in the Colorado region.  For more information regarding Bit please read here:

SXSW Dewey Winburne Community Service Award Nominations are now open!

Dewey Winburne Community Service AwardsEvery year SXSW honors 10 amazing people serving their communities in different ways in honor of SXSW Interactive co-founder, Dewey Winburne. Dewey was one of the original co-founders of the SXSW Interactive Festival, but he was many other things in the Austin community: a family man, a teacher, a visionary, a connector and an innovator. He believed that technology could bridge the digital divide and help those less fortunate than others.

Knowbility stands to prove that all individuals deserve an opportunity to make an impact in their community through access to education, career, and opportunities to pursue all things web technology. The SXSW Dewey awards are intended to honor technology change makers that are using hi-tech for good in their communities.

Nominate someone you know (or yourself) at today through August 7, 2015, for a chance to be honored at the SXSW Interactive festival in March 2016. Each honoree also receives $1,000 to grant to their favorite 501(c)(3).

Accessibility in the National Day of Civic Hacking

Participating in the National Day of Civic Hacking

The first national Hackathon for Change was held on June 1st and 2nd and was every bit as exciting as I anticipated.  The event had much of the same energy, idealism, and enthusiasm that we see each year in our annual Accessibility Internet Rally (AIR) competitions. If you’re familiar with AIR, you know that since 1998 Knowbility has fostered teams of tech volunteers to donate time and talent by building accessible web sites for nonprofit groups.

Similarly, this last weekend of civic hacking brought more than 10,000 volunteers out within their own communities to participate in more than 95 separate hackathon events.  Data sets from dozens of government entities were made available to the hackers with the challenge to use  publicly-released data, code and technology to solve problems relevant to our neighborhoods, our cities, our states, and our country. If the energy at Austin’s ATX Hackathon for Change was any indication, people of all ages and skills actively and joyfully embraced the opportunity to use technology to make a difference in the lives of citizens – truly awesome!

St Edward’s University hosted the local event and Open Austin was the primary organizer.  What distinguished the Austin Hackathon from the others is this:  alone of all the programs I surveyed, Austin had web accessibility prompts in the orientation materials for all volunteers and included on their Expert Panel an accessibility advocate – me! It is always exciting to watch coders, designers, and planners respond to the accessibility challenge.  The experience led me to examine once again the nature of the field of digital accessibility and what is currently needed to truly advance and bring into the mainstream the practice of accessible design.

Mainstreaming digital accessibility

Some have been calling for the creation of an International Society of Accessibility Professionals.  But here is what I wonder:  What exactly will the establishment of a separate organization for these professionals do to integrate accessibility into the practice of smart, eager, engaged developers and designers such as those who participated in the National Day of Civic Hacking?  Does a professional organization really capture the imagination and fire of those for whom development is a calling and who respond to challenges like gaming and mash-ups?  I truly do not know the answer.

But I do know from participation in AIR and again this weekend that when accessibility is integrated as part of a broader community engagement, it is easy to “get” it.   I see lights go on and accessibility embraced on a community level by bright entrepreneurs, designers, gamers, and developers. I know that when accessibility is integrated into a lively practice, it is more likely to be accepted and improved upon than when it is siloed off into a separate category.

Accessibility practitioners are no different than any other specialized discipline.  If kept in isolation, the echo chamber effect creeps in, bad practices can be institutionalized, and adaptive change becomes more difficult.  Including accessibility along with other design considerations, integrating accessibility into iterative processes, ensuring that accessibility is part of the tumble of the development process – I believe THAT  is the way to keep accessibility ideas and practice fresh, innovative, and truly relevant.

What would John Slatin do?

Participating in the National Day of Civic Hacking was big, fat, super happy fun.  Let’s find more ways to integrate accessibility.  I challenge advocates out there. Instead of (or in addition to) submitting your papers to disability conferences and speaking to the singing choir, why not submit to wild and wooly design and tech conferences – like Big(D)esign and SXSW Interactive – that have nothing in particular to do with accessibility?

Dr. John Slatin was an English professor, a poet, and a lover of technology who happened to be blind.  He inspired students and colleagues as he fostered art, language, and technology-related research projects that were not easily described or pigeon-holed. John was an effective accessibility advocate precisely because his imagination was fired by the potential of technology to bridge gaps of language, culture, geography, and yes – disability.  Let’s get out there and truly demonstrate the truth of John Slatin’s words…Good design IS accessible design.  Onward!




First Round Winners of Open AIR Announced!

The first round of judging for Open AIR has come to an end, and the winners were announced on Friday at a  party at Cover 3 in North Austin. Six winners were announced in two categories, Basic and Advanced, based on the nonprofit’s requirements for the site and the number of advanced features (like video, audio, or ARIA widgets) that were attempted.

We had so many fantastic sites submitted that it was incredibly difficult to narrow the results down to just six. These six sites will be allowed to make updates to their sites and resubmit for another round of judging, and the final winners will be announced at the Dewey Winburne Awards and Open AIR Awards Ceremony on March 11, 2013, at SXSW.

AIR sites are judged by a panel of accessibility experts, including Jim Thatcher, Preety Kumar (CEO at Deque), and Knowbility’s own Geri Druckman. Thanks to the judges for all their hard work and to Deque for sharing use of their excellent WorldSpace tool with us!

Without any further ado, here are the Round One winners and their non-profit organizations!

Basic Category

  1. Headspring Hurwitzes: Texas ROSE
  2. Team Canada: Black Creek Community Health Centre
  3. Team Web-able: Council on At-Risk Youth

Advanced Category

  1. Basic Semantics: The Virginia Home
  2. The Green Team: ASPIRE
  3. EZXS_ibility: HaShem’s House

Stay tuned for more news on the Open AIR winners!