Tag Archives: knowbility

Disability is Not a Problem; it is Part of Who You Are.

Article by Patricia Walsh, Principal at Blind Ambition Speaking and USA Para National Olympic-Distance Triathlon Champion 

 

When I was growing up, the future for persons with disabilities did not seem bright to me.  I was coached in the process for applying for SSDI.  I believed to collect social security was my ceiling with regard to my potential for inclusion.  As I have lived to see the tremendous change brought on by accessible technology I’m thrilled to have experienced firsthand the shattering of a ceiling of human potential.  Working and contributing is more than a pathway to income, it is a yellow brick road to quality of life, self-worth, and a sense of achievement.  Organizations such as Knowbility and similar organizations like the Blind Institute of Technology are driving the cultural changes to create new opportunities for individuals with disabilities.

Mike Hess is the founder of the Blind Institute for Technology based out of Denver, CO.  This nonprofit organization is dedicated to increasing representation of persons with blindness in the workforce particularly in the fields of science, math, engineering, and technology.  Hess believes that his success in the corporate world was not in spite of his blindness but actually attributed to his blindness.  He believes his listening skills, problem solving, and resourcefulness made him an invaluable contributor in corporate America.

Hess started BIT in order to be part of the solution.  They offer training for persons with blindness in tech-skills.  They also interface with corporations to convey that persons with blindness can be an invaluable peace for any solution.  BIT is a similar program to Knowbility’s Access works program.  Access Works has a reach beyond blindness but similar in its approach.  The premise being that the disability is not a problem it is an asset.  In a world that values diversity and creative solution there is now access to a previously untapped pool of talented skills individuals.

Congratulations to BIT and Mike Hess for building on a change in perspective that may result in improved quality of life for individuals with blindness in the Colorado region.  For more information regarding Bit please read here:  http://www.denverpost.com/business/ci_28502401/blind-institute-technology-aims-solve-jobless-epidemic

SXSW Dewey Winburne Community Service Award Nominations are now open!

Dewey Winburne Community Service AwardsEvery year SXSW honors 10 amazing people serving their communities in different ways in honor of SXSW Interactive co-founder, Dewey Winburne. Dewey was one of the original co-founders of the SXSW Interactive Festival, but he was many other things in the Austin community: a family man, a teacher, a visionary, a connector and an innovator. He believed that technology could bridge the digital divide and help those less fortunate than others.

Knowbility stands to prove that all individuals deserve an opportunity to make an impact in their community through access to education, career, and opportunities to pursue all things web technology. The SXSW Dewey awards are intended to honor technology change makers that are using hi-tech for good in their communities.

Nominate someone you know (or yourself) at  http://www.sxsw.com/interactive/awards/dewey-winburne today through August 7, 2015, for a chance to be honored at the SXSW Interactive festival in March 2016. Each honoree also receives $1,000 to grant to their favorite 501(c)(3).

Tommy Edison at AccessU 2015

Tommy-Edison

Knowbility is excited to welcome Tommy Edison as keynote speaker at AccessU 2015 this May.

“Being blind since birth, one of the greatest challenges I faced was accepting that I’m visually impaired.” Tommy told us.  “As I became an adult, I was forced to face my own reality and needed to make a choice – either embrace my blindness and live a happier life or do something I might regret. Eventually I chose the former which led me to a long career in radio, living my dream of reviewing movies, and sharing my experiences as a blind person to a worldwide audience. In my talk, I explain how I faced my greatest obstacle – myself.”

Popularly known as The Blind Film Critic, Tommy’s YouTube channel, TommyEdisonXP (https://www.youtube.com/user/TommyEdisonXP) has 195,000 subscribers and garners a million views per video. By addressing the barriers he faced, Tommy will illuminate the AccessU theme of “Put People First.”

In my talk, I explain how I faced my greatest obstacle – myself.

“I watch movies and pay attention to them in a different way than sighted people do”, says Tommy, who offers a unique take on movies, audio and daily life through his signature sense of humor.

In addition to being the Blind Film Critic and a YouTube celebrity, Tommy has been a radio professional for nearly 25 years, having spent the last 19 at STAR 99.9 FM in Connecticut as a traffic reporter.

Tommy Edison was endorsed by film critic and journalist Roger Ebert and his reviews were posted on the Chicago Sun-Times blog and on Tosh.0, Comedy Central’s blog. Tommy has also been featured on various TV and news channels including CNN and Headline News. Visit his website http://blindfilmcritic.com/ for more information.

“I’m not distracted by all the beautiful shots and attractive people. I watch a movie for the writing and acting.”

Tommy will also host a special event “Film & Audio Description with the Blind Film Critic” at Alamo Draft house as part of the conference.

AccessU participants are invited to events organized as part of the conference including a Film & Audio Description with Tommy Edison at Alamo Draft house, a bicycle pub crawl in Austin and networking luncheons.

Usability Meets Accessibility in our Access-Works Webinar – Sept 5th

Our Access-Works usability/accessibility Testing Portal is live at Access-Works Portal! Join us for a 30 minute live demo-webinar Wednesday, September 5th, 3PM CST. It’s free.

Knowbility Executive Director, Sharron Rush, and Loop11 CEO, Toby Biddle, will show how the portal works and talk about why including users with disabilities in site testing is not just a good idea; it saves you time and money.

If you’re a Usability or Accessibility professional, please join us. Reserve a seat today – register for the webinar. With the Access-works testing portal you can ensure that your site is universally designed for a diverse marketplace that includes persons with disabilities.

Knowbility and Loop11 created the Access-Works Portal to make remote usability and accessibility testing easy. The portal lets you choose test participants from a database of users with disabilities using a wide range of assistive technologies like JAWS, WindowEyes, and NVDA screen-readers, ZoomText and MAGIC Screen Magnifiers, Dragon Naturally Speaking Voice Recognition Software, refreshable braille displays, alternative input devices and more.

Good Web Designers and Usability Professionals understand the need for inclusive design and the problems associated with integrating accessibility as an afterthought. Check out these papers on why.

Cost-Justifying Accessibility – Paul Sherman (2001)
Accessibility and Usability in Information & Communication Technology – Bloor Research (2007)
Assessing Usability for People with Disabilities through Remote Evaluation – The Paciello Group (2002)

Not Your Ordinary Conference: 30 Seconds with Elle Waters

 

Elle Waters
Elle Waters, who will mix things up at the 2012 John Slatin AccessU.

Elle Waters has put something new on the menu for AccessU: One part accessibility and one part video games, mixed together and served with a side of costumes for refreshing treat, available for a limited time only. Get a taste with the following 30-Second Interview, the second in our series featuring the presenters of the 2012 John Slatin AccessU!


Who are you?

My name is Elle Waters, and I work at a Fortune 500 health insurance company called Humana. I’m a web accessibility specialist. That’s my day job, but I’m also a huge advocate for grassroots accessibility awareness and education and part of the accessibility unconference movement – I think you can call us a movement. It’s gotten pretty big and is in several cities now.

What will you be doing at AccessU?

We have a 3.5 hour workshop targeted toward accessibility professionals in big business or government – places not specifically about the biz of accessibility. Wendy Chisholm (@wendyabc/www.sp1ral.org)  from Microsoft will be helping present somehow, possibly through Skype – she was the catalyst for this workshop. Our goal is to help people craft their accessibility message so that they can move it within the company for a better understanding of accessibility and then better adoption and better funding. We are going to start with a talk about video games…and we may show up in costume. This isn’t going to be a dry presentation.

Costume? That’s awesome. So tell me, why do you care about accessibility anyway?

I care because I believe very much in equality on the web. It’s what I’ve been doing ever since I got involved on the web. I first got interested in virtual worlds; I loved how it provided a way for people in far-flung parts of the world to connect and break down barriers. I want to reduce barriers and make things accessible in the truest sense. I believe in freedom of the web, and I believe this is a civil rights issue.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned recently?

What I’m really interested in lately is the research side of things. I’ve started getting more involved in understanding people with cognitive disabilities and how we can cater toward their needs. By lately, I mean just this week. I’ve also been reading about people with vestibular disorders, which I’d never thought about before, and I’m really excited to learn about it. I’m plumbing the depths of the not-so-apparent disability groups and figuring out what their needs are.

What would you tell people who don’t think accessibility should be a priority?

There’s a two-punch way of being able to talk to people. They either deal with it now or deal with it later. They either take a proactive approach and get to be a leader in the field, to be a herald of standards, and to take pride and ownership over the quality of their site. Or they can do it later. But then I tell them that the movement is already here, and a demand for equal access has already been established. Corporations can either be ahead of that wave, or swept away by it, which usually involves litigation or compliance issues. If you’re not thinking ahead, you’re going to be left behind your competitors.

 I spend a lot of time talking to leaders in the corporate world, so this my “stump speech.” For other people, I talk more about the civil rights of accessibility and inclusion, but the corporate world isn’t as interested in that.

Any last words?

Yes! I encourage people to go to AccessU because there are more interesting speakers, and I don’t mean myself, this year than any of the other years that I’ve seen, and I expect it to challenge people and excite them and really turn over what they think about learning conferences….like having costumes.


For a full serving of Elle’s presentation, join us at AccessU on May 15 at 2:00pm. And learn more about Elle on her website www.ellewaters.com, or follow her on Twitter (@nethermind).